Monday, March 30, 2020

How to Care for Lavender Before Planting


If you have picked up a few plants from your local nursery (or plan to!), but have not yet broken ground to plant them, we've put together some tips for keeping your precious lavender starts healthy in the interim. 


There are over 40 species of lavender and over 400 varieties of lavender.  From a landscaping perspective the range of blooming time, size, flower color, shape, fragrance and foliage color is thrilling.  No matter your garden size, color scheme or style, there is likely a lavender that will fit in beautifully.

 

Lavender starts are most commonly sold in 4", 6" (quart) and gallon pots.  The size you start with is entirely up to you.  A 4" start will usually take about 3 years to reach it's mature size.  Larger sizes will take less time, of course, but are usually about twice the price.

Nurseries and growers usually plant lavender in a water-retaining potting mix with a bit of mulch on top to help retain water prior to planting.  It is important to keep lavender moist, but not soggy, while it is awaiting planting.  Check the dampness of the soil every other day by sticking your finger into the soil about 1/2 an inch.  If it feels dry, give it a good watering.  Another way to check is to lift the pot.  If it feels light it's probably drying out and in need of water.

It's important to allow the water to drain.  Lavender does not like to sit in water.  Avoid using a tray to capture the water that comes out of the holes in the bottom of the pot.  Allow it to drain away whenever you water.


Full sun is necessary for lavender to thrive in pots prior to planting and in the ground.  Keep lavender starts outside in full light as much as is possible before you plant them.  If you live in a cold area that can experience spring freezes, keep your starts up against your house or garage in a protected area or in a garage next to a window that receives lots of light.


To keep your lavender starts happy and healthy before planting, be sure to keep them:
  • well-watered and well-drained
  • in full light
  • protected from freezing

When you are ready to plant them, be sure to review our lavender growing tips for successful lavender cultivation in-ground and in-pot.

We love talking about lavender.  If you have specific questions about growing lavender (or pruning lavender!), we would be delighted to answer them in the comments below.

12 comments:

  1. Can Lavender be grown on a windowsill, facing East, in an apartment. Always my favorite fragrance.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Unfortunately lavender is not a houseplant. It may survive if it gets enough direct light (8 hours ideally during the flowering season), but it won't thrive.
      That being said, there are other ways to bring the wonderful fragrance of lavender to your living space - Lavender Candles, Lavender Room Mist, Lavender Diffuser, Lavender Linen Water, etc. We handcraft all of these products at our farm. Pop over to our website and checkout our "Home Fragrance" products (under the Products menu).

      Delete
  2. I just purchased 4 lavender plants today. I will be planting them very soon. Thank you for the advice. Long live lavender!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Is there a variety that will grow in central Florida? And if so, when would it usually bloom? I have a plant that does well in the mountains of NC, but haven’t had luck in Florida.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. While lavender thrives on heat, it doesn't like humidity. Growing lavender in Florida is quite challenging. If you think of lavender in Florida as an annual and plant it in the area of your yard that is the driest and gets the most air circulation, you might be able to get one year out of it. That being said, don't expect much. Lavender is just not well suited to Florida unfortunately.

      Delete
    2. I'm going to guess that growing Lavender in Central Louisiana with it's high humidity would also be a low expectation area?

      Delete
  4. Do you ship your lavender plants within the state during our quarantine time?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We don't ship live plants, but a local nursery of good repute will likely be able to order whatever variety you would like. Just be sure to provide them the full botanical name, which will start with "Lavandula" (genus) and then be followed by the species and variety names.

      This is a nursery we can recommend and they do ship plants - http://www.goodwincreekgardens.com/.

      Delete
  5. I purchased plants last year. I kept the pots in the house all winter. They are very green and healthy. They are now outside in full sun, but have not flowered. I plan on planting them in the soil soon. Will they bloom soon?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. To answer your question, we'll need to ask a few questions...:)
      1. Where do you live? Your local climate has a significant effect on blooming time.
      2. Which varieties do you have? There are over 400 different varieties of lavender and a wide range of blooming times among them.
      3. When did you bring them outside? How long have them been receiving full-sun? Sun and temperature are contributors to triggering new growth that will bloom.

      If you'd like to take some pictures of your plants and email them to admin@pelindaba.com we may be able to provide more specific advice to your situation.

      Delete